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Daily Archives: August 8, 2013

Truth or truth – Promote Yourself

 

pipesxxxxxx
Truth is truth, excepting the occasions when it is not.

My Truth is not my friend’s truth,

Not my father’s truth, my child’s.

 

Truth can only be expressed in words. Relative and poorly constructed.

And words are fallible, unstable, misused and abused.

 

Words are no more than signs and symbols,

Signifiers of a subjective existence.

 

A Childs’ game of categories, to compartmentalise a continuum.

Words change, expand and contract, as endlessly they shift

As grains of sand on a beach.

 

There is no truth in a dictionary, every word a lie.

Words cannot be what they seek to represent,

They cannot transcend.

 “Ceci n’est pas une pipe.”
Truth is the trick of a conjuror, the white rabbit

No longer in the hat. With Sleight of Hand our daylight truths

Become in darkness, our deepest fears.

 

“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God,

And the Word was God”  but my God is not yours,

Real truth lies only with the Omnipotent.

 

And what treasons are committed in the treachery of a word.

Innocence slain, commands, orders, and just cause for the belligerent.

Give your life only for love.

“Verum esse ipsum factum” – All truth is a lie.
 
© John Bullock 2013

John Bullock

Journalist, Editor & Writer
07824 602520
john.bullock@live.co.uk
http://about.me/john_bullock17
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SEND IN YOUR LIMERICKS TODAY

The origin of the actual name limerick

“The origin of the actual name limerick for this type of poem is obscure. Its usage was first documented in England in 1898 (New English Dictionary) and in America in 1902.

It is generally taken to be a reference to the County of Limerick in Ireland (particularly the Maigue Poets), and may derive from an earlier form of nonsense verse parlour game which traditionally included a refrain that ended “Come all the way up to Limerick?” (referring to Limerick, Ireland).”

 

Lady from China

There was a young lady from China,
Who went to sea on a liner,
She fell off the deck,
And twisted her neck,
And now can see right behind her.

A flea and a fly in a flue

Were caught, so what could they do?

Said the fly, “Let us flee.”

“Let us fly,” said the flea.

So they flew through a flaw in the flue.

 

-Anonymous

A limerick fan from Australia

regarded his work as a failure:

his verses were fine

until the fourth line


There was a young lady named Kite

Whose speed was much faster than light.

She left home one day

In a relative way

 And returned on the previous night. 

SO WHERE’S YOURS?

Send it to@poetreecreations@yahoo.com

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