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Daily Archives: April 23, 2017

For The King And St George

Nice!

crispina kemp

Order of the Garter

St George and Dragon

Honi soit qui mal y pense
Evil to him who thinks evil of it

Edward III established the Order of the Garter on St George’s Day 1349, his aim to bind into a brotherhood a select group of knights, twenty-five in all.

An honourable intent?

The Black Death raged across Europe. The monks in their monasteries, the lords in their manor halls and castles – the king’s own family – the paupers, the hard-working, the idlers, indiscriminate of whom it infected, the plague wiped out between a third and half of all England’s population. Famine and starvation followed. Yet the king ordered a grand tournament – the main event to be a battle to decide which of the countess of Salisbury’s two husbands had the legal right! And for the accompanying festivities the king’s court dressed in their finest. Unsurprising, the monks, clerics and priors objected.

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St George’s Day

st goger

Happy St George’s Day! Nowadays, it’s not St George’s martyrdom that propelled him to popularity, but the tales of his heroism in slaying dragons and rescuing maidens.

Whilst St George never visited the British Isles, during the Middle Ages he became revered by the English and according to legend fought on their side in the Crusades and the Hundred Years’ War.

Several cities, towns and villages around the country are enthusiastically celebrating St George, so we thought we would bring you some nostalgic photos that might help in a small way remind us all of what makes England so great!

Salisbury, High Street 1919

The cathedral city of Salisbury in Wiltshire is one of the few places to celebrate the English National Day of St George on April 23rd and processions, tableaux, and fireworks make it a special day in the manner of the original medieval celebrations of the occasion.

Photo: Salisbury, High Street 1919.

Ipswich, The Ancient House 1921

Ipswich in Suffolk is famous for the Ancient House (or Sparrowe’s House) with its incredible decorative plasterwork known as pargetting. The building was remodelled with its pargetting by Robert Sparrowe around 1670, and an interesting feature of the decoration is St George slaying a dragon (symbolizing evil) whilst wearing a top hat.

Photo: Ipswich, The Ancient House 1921.

Fordington, St George's Church 1898

The earliest known dedication to St George in a church in England is at Fordington in Dorset (now part of Dorchester) that is mentioned in the will of King Alfred the Great.
The St George’s Church at Fordington that we see today was first built in the Middle Ages, and the Perpendicular tower is 15th-century. Parts of it date from around AD1100, constructed in what is known architecturally as the Norman or Romanesque style. The most obvious feature of this period greets the visitor on entering the porch. This is the tympanum, the semicircular stone above the inner door. It has a carving interpreted as St. George coming to the aid of Crusaders at the battle of Antioch during the First Crusade in 1098.

Photo: Fordington, St George’s Church 1898.

Pinner, The Queens Head c.1955

The Queen’s Head is little changed – maybe a horse trough on the pavement but the front of the building is pure English village pub! It was the starting point for many a village pub crawl and some fun times pushing wheelbarrows of tipsy teenage friends on charity fundraising days in the 1960’s. Little did I realise back in 1966 that forty years later I would still be calling at the Queen’s Head but instead of pushing a wheelbarrow I would be playing an accordian for the Whitethorn Morris Dancers! It has been a popular venue for morris dancers and mummers – particularly on St George’s Day.” (A memory shared by John Howard Norfolk.)

Photo: Pinner, The Queens Head c.1955.
Memory: A Traditional English Pub!

Stevenage, St George's Church c.1960

One of the most distinctive buildings of Stevenage in Hertfordshire is the Church of St Andrew and St George near the Town Gardens in St George’s Way, a striking example of modern church design. It was constructed in the 1960s to serve the New Town and was originally consecrated as St George’s, but was re-dedicated to St Andrew and St George in 1984. It is the largest parish church to have been built in England since the Second World War.

Photo: Stevenage, St George’s Church c.1960.

Windsor, The Castle, St George's Chapel 1895

Windsor is dominated by its famous castle, the principal residence of the sovereigns of the United Kingdom and the largest continually inhabited medieval castle in the world. St George’s Chapel is the chapel of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, the world’s oldest order of chivalry; the Order was founded in 1348 by King Edward III who was a great admirer of the warrior saint. The Order originally honoured knightly valour, but today’s Knights of the Garter are chosen from people who have served their country notably or achieved something exceptional. Each knight has a stall in St George’s chapel where their knightly achievements hang (crest, helm, mantling, sword and banner).

Photo: Windsor, The Castle, St George’s Chapel 1895.

Great Yarmouth, St George's Church 1891

Halfway along King Street in Great Yarmouth in Norfolk is St George’s Church, one of the few Classical-style churches in East Anglia. It was built in 1714 by John Price, modelled on a baroque design borrowed from Christopher Wren, and endowed by a special Act of Parliament. This historic church has characteristic 18th-century galleries, pulpit and reredos, and a plaster ceiling above the nave. St George’s Church is now used as an arts centre.

Photo: Great Yarmouth, St George’s Church 1891.

Painted Egg Cartons

NICE

Inspiration Rose

Painted Egg Cartons

Painted Egg Cartons

This is a nice idea to put chocolate eggs in, decorated eggs as show here, or even to add some colour to your fridge instead of boring cardboard.

Painted Egg Cartons

Materials:
Egg Carton
Paint
Paint Brushes
Shredded Paper (optional)

Painted Egg Cartons

Step One: Paint the carton any colour you like. I painted mine turquoise and coral with gold dots for one and gold stripes for the other.

Painted Egg Cartons

Step Two: Place the shredded paper in the carton

Painted Egg Cartons

Done!

Painted Egg Cartons

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St George Was A Very Brave Guy

 

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St George was a very brave guy

As he set out to slay the dragon

He set out on his trusty steed

With all his weapons pack on his wagon

 

He hunted high and low to find the dragon

He travelled far and wide

He decided to set up camp and rest

Placed his head in his hands and cried

 

Then in the distance he heard a mighty roar

With fire and smoke he could see

He decided to wait until morning

Snuggled down to sleep under a tree

 

As the sun arose in the morning

He mounted his trusty steed

For he was in a great hurry

As he galloped of at a very fast pace

 

He finally came face to face with the dragon

Who was snorting out fire and smoke?

He looked at St George and sniggered

For the dragon thought it was a big joke

 

A battle ensued between both of them

A furious fight took place

In the end St George was the victor

But the dragon died with a smile on his face

cartoon_dragon (1) 

Malcolm G Bradshaw

Saint Georges day



 

Saint George sat all alone

In a tavern enjoying a flagon

He was pondering deep in thought

On how he was going to slay the dragon

 

He mounted his trusty steed

In his armour with shield and lance

Sped of into the distance thinking

Would he succeed, would he stand a chance?

 

As he approached the clearing

The mighty dragon stood tall

With fire coming from his nostrils

He stood with his back to the wall

 

A mighty battle soon enraged

As George lunged forward with his lance

The dragon fought with courage

But alas the dragon didn’t stand a chance

 

He rid the village of the dragon

So everyone could live in peace

The villages hailed him a hero

For the terror now was to cease

 

George became the patron saint of England

Where it’s celebrated every year

So enjoy all the celebrations you attend

When you see Saint George give him a cheer

  

Malcolm Bradshaw

St George and Smokey Joe

St George he had a dragon

 

He called him Smoky Joe

 

He used to cough and splutter

 

And blows smoke wherever he would go.

 

One day he drank some water

 

And steam came out his ears

 

This made old Smoky wither

 

And brought poor George to tears ,

 

But George still pretended he had slain all the dragon’s

 

But did he slay them all ?

 

They say there are some in England,

 

With lot’s of spiky scales

 

But the myth is that they live somewhere

 

But maybe somewhere in South Wales.

 

By Thomas Sims


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