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Category Archives: Bonfire night

The Bonfire at Night: A poem by Enid Blyto YOUR FAVOURITE POEM – Famous Poet

Bonfire, you’re a merry fellow
With your flames of red and yellow,
And your cheery cracks and pops-
You gobble up the old bean-props,
The pea-sticks, withered plants, and all
The leaves blown down beside the wall.
Your never-ending spires of smoke
(The colour of a pixy’s cloak)
Go mounting to the starry sky,
And when the wind comes bustling by
Oh, what a merry game you play,
And how you pop and roar away!
Your heart is red, your smoke is thick,
On, pile on leaves and branches quick!
Let’s dance around and shout and sing,
Oh, Bonfire, you’re a LOVELY thing!

From the Enid Blyton Poetry book, 1934.

 YOUR FAVOURITE POEM SENT IN BY YOU WHAT’S YOURS

Guy Fawkes

It’s just one night

A burning desire

To burn Guy Fawkes

On a blazing fire,

Celebrations light up the sky

Colourful fireworks shoot up high

Blues, Pinks, Greens and red

Celebrating each year of his death,

Around the fire hundreds stare

Watching the embers fade

Quietly putting Guy Fawkes to rest

Abbe Cutforth

 

 

 

 

Bonfire Night

As we celebrate bonfire night

Let us remember when it all began

Guy Fawkes tried to blow up Parliament

The government of the day was not a fan

 

His attempt to destroy failed

For his treachery he was hung

Today we all celebrate bonfire night

With everyone having lots of fun

 

With fireworks and sparklers

Jumping jacks, bangers and mushy peas

The fire burning lightening up the sky

See the rockets flying over the trees

 

The smell of bonfire toffee

Fireworks displaying so bright

The fire well alight now

Lightning up the darkest night

 

Remember to be careful

For fireworks can burn and maim

Let your parents light them all

Keeping all away from hurt and pain

 

                                                        Malcolm G Bradshaw

Bonfire night memories

It’s bonfire night and  the sky
is full of crackles and bangs,
brightly coloured lights.
The  damp November air;
full of gunpowder and
the smell of fires
and  smoke
everywhere!
.
Oh how I love this atmosphere.
If only I had  someone to tell about
‘our penny for the guy’
or the terrific bonfires  we built.

I have the honour of lighting it,
with lighted match,  hands shaking,
searching for dry paper.
Then little fires start to build  inside;
the first smell of smoke
as wood starts to light,
this is  just the beginning alright.
‘It’s lit! it’s lit!’ everyone shouts.

I  remember the flames,
that licked the sleepers dry,
swirling bright  yellow flames,
leaping higher and higher,
‘can’t you just feel that  fire!’
The heat on my face,
‘ look my coat is steaming!’

Excited  faces all around,
Dad saying ‘be careful son.
‘Don’t get too near that  fire
or that air bomb that didn’t go off,
it could explode at any  second!’
Don’t worry Dad, I’m alright.
(never felt better in fact)
This is definitely the best night,
It is just so brilliant it is.

Oh if only I was still a kid,
I’d be outside right now with my friends,
eyes wide open trying to take it all in,
ears primed; ready for  the big bangs,
deciding which firework to light next.
Not sitting here  enjoying my memories
of November the fifth’s gone by—
Just sat at my  computer, writing this.

by  Simon Icke. copyright  2009

more of Simon’s poem can be found on the Tring People website:
http://www.tringpeople.co.uk/Poetry-group-Tring-People/story-12982944-detail/story.html

SCARY MARY

 

Scary Mary would like to be pretty

Someone that was gorgeous and lush

But alas she was born with a face

With wrinkles all over her mush

Her hair was all in a tangle

With a wart on the end of her nose

She is pretty disgusting

From her head down to her toes

She though I will make a potion

To make me a beautiful bell

But alas forgot the words

To create her powerful spell

So speaking the words that she thought

Throwing in larks tongue and essence of goat

Next morning she looked in the mirror

Realising she’d turn into a bloke

Knowing she could not  turn her self back

She rushed out of the room in a hurry

Then she changed her name by de pole

Now she goes under the name Murray

Malcolm  Bradshaw
WE ALL HOPE YOU HAVE A SAFE BONFIRE NIGHT

penny for the guy

  • “Remember, remember
  • the Fifth of November
  • is gunpowder treason and plot.
  • I see no reason
  • why gunpowder treason
  • should ever be forgot.
  • Knock at the door,
  • ring the bell.
  • Have you got a penny for
  • singing so well ?
  • If you haven’t got a penny
  • a ha’penny will do
  • If you haven’t got a ha’penny
  • then God bless you !!”

BONFIRE NIGHT BY MALCOLM BRADSHAW

LOOK OUT -THERE’S A BONFIRE TREAT COMING DONT GET BURNT THE POETRY IS RED HOT

Bonfire Night By Malcolm Bradshaw

WHO IS THIS GUY CHECK HIM OUT ON NOVEMBER 5TH

LOOK OUT SCARY MARYS ABOUT WHO DARES TRY MARYS RECIPES ON THIS HALLOWEEN NIGHT?

TRY ONE IF YOU DARE

  • Cinder toffee

This recipe is classed as easy

Prep time:
20 min, plus setting
Cook time:
25 min

My favourite recipe for glossy toffee – perfect for passing around at Halloween and Bonfire Night parties

Ingredients


 Method
1. Line a 15cm square tin with greaseproof or parchment paper.2. Put the syrup, sugar, butter and water into a large heavy-bottomed pan set over a medium heat. Stir until the sugar has dissolved, before turning up the heat and bringing to the boil.3. Cook, without stirring until a teaspoon of the hot toffee mixture becomes a hard ball when dropped into a jug of cold water. If you have a sugar thermometer, it should register 138C. Remove the pan from the heat.4. Add the vinegar and bicarbonate of soda to the pan – take care as the toffee mixture will bubble up and rise in the pan. Pour immediately into the lined tin and leave on one side.5. After about 15- 20 minutes, when the mixture has begun to set, score the toffee in square shapes, using a sharp
Bangers and mash

This recipe is classed as easy

Prep time:
10 min
Cook time:
30 min
Serves:
4

Rich onion gravy transforms this family favourite into a meal fit for a king fro

Ingredients

For the onion gravy

For the mash

  • 1 kg flourypotatoes, King Edwards or Maris Piper are good
  • 100 ml milk
  • 75 g butter
  • 1 grate ofnutmeg
  • salt and freshly groundblack pepper

For the sausages


Method

1. First make the gravy. Heat the olive oil and butter in a saucepan and soften the onions and thyme over a very gentle heat. It’s best to cook them, without colouring, for about 10-15 minutes. Give the onions a good stir now and again.

2. Remove the lid, turn up the heat and continue frying the onions until they turn a deep russet brown. Add the wine and bubble until it has almost evaporated. Pour in the stock and add the bay leaf. Season with salt and freshly ground pepper.

3. Simmer, uncovered for about 15 minutes, until thickened. Leave on one side.

4. Heat the oven to 190C/gas 5. Put the sausages in a small roasting tin, drizzle with olive oil, and cook for about 20 minutes, until golden. Turn once or twice while in the oven.

5. While the sauce and sausages are cooking, start with the mash. Peel, half (or quarter) the potatoes and transfer to a deep saucepan filled with lightly salted water. Boil until the potatoes are tender.

6. Drain in a colander and return to the pan. Shake the potatoes over a very low heat for a few seconds until they have dried out. Crush with a potato masher or you could use a potato ricer.

7. Heat the milk with the butter, nutmeg and seasoning and gradually add most of it into the potatoes, beating well between each addition. An electric whisk is good for this. Check the consistency by adding more hot milk if needed. If you’re planning on keeping the potatoes warm, pour a thin layer of hot milk mixture over the surface and cover with a lid.

8. Warm the sauce and serve with the sausages and mash.

Toffee apples
This recipe is classed as intermediate

Prep time:
20 min
Cook time:
20 min
Serves:
6

Taste nostalgic childhood memories with Roopa Gulati’s traditional toffee-coated apple

Ingredients

For the toffee coating

  • 225 g demerara sugar
  • 110 ml water
  • 0.5 tsp vinegar
  • 2 tbsp golden syrup
  • 25 g butter

For the apples

  • 6 apples
  • 6 wooden skewers, for holding the apples – ice lolly sticks will do

Method

1. Dissolve the sugar in the water over a moderate heat. When it has dissolved, stir in the vinegar, syrup and butter. Bring to a boil and cook without stirring until it reaches hard-crack stage (138C) or hardens into a ball when dropped in a jug of cold water. This should take around 10 minutes boiling time.

2. While the syrup is cooking, pierce each apple with a wooden stick. Once the toffee is ready, dip each apple into the hot toffee, turning it around in the syrup so that each one is fully coated.

3. Leave to harden on a lightly oiled tray before serving. If you’re planning to keep them for a day or two, wrap the apples in cellophan

Scary Mary says don’t forget mum and dad on Bonfire night
 

Hot mulled cider punchIngredients

  • 100 g brown sugar
  • 1 pinches salt
  • 2 litres cider
  • 1 tsp ground allspice
  • 1 tsp  wholecloves
  • 1 pinches nutmeg
  • 2 oranges, peel only, cut into segments
  • 6 cm cinnamon sticks
  • 50  g  blanched flakedalmonds,   lightly toasted

Method

1. Combine the sugar and salt, and add to the cider in a large saucepan.

2. Tie the spices in cheesecloth and add to the cider. Slowly bring to the boil. Cover and simmer for 20 minutes.

3. Remove the spices and add the orange peel, cinnamon stick and toasted almonds before serving in a punch bowls

Chilli con carne

This recipe is classed as easy

Prep time:
20 min
Cook time:
1 hr 30 min
Serves:
6

Ingredients

  • 2 large onions
  • 700 g lean stewing beef, fat removed and cut into 1-2cm cubes
  • 5 clovesgarlic, crushed
  • 800 g canned chopped tomatoes
  • 2 green peppers,  sliced
  • 3   green or redchillies,   chopped, seeds left in if you like your chillies fiery
  • 2 tsp  groundcumin
  • 1 tinned redkidney beans, 400g
  • 1 tsp brown sugar

To serve


Method

Heat the olive oil in a casserole,or saucepan and fry the meat until it changes colour – about 5-7 minutes. Add the onion and garlic and stir for a minute or so before tipping in the tinned tomatoes,chopped chillies, peppers, and a good pinch of salt.

Cover the pan and simmer for about an hour, until the meat is tender and the liquid reduced to a thick sauce. If it gets too dry during cooking, pour in a little more water.

Add the cumin, kidney beans (and a little of the bean liquid,if you like)and the brown sugar. Simmer for a further 10 mins before serving with rice, a spoonful of sour cream, grated cheddar cheese and and coriander leaves as a garnish.  For added spicy kick, serve this dish with hot chilli sauce.

The Gun Powder Plot Poem

 

Some twelve months ago,
An hundred or so,
The Pope went to visit the devil;
And as, you will find,
Old Nick, to a friend,
Can behave himself wondrous civil.

Quoth the De’il to the Seer,
What the De’il brought you her
It was surely some whimsical maggot:
Come, draw to the fire;
Nay, prithee, sit nigher:
Heree, sirrah! lay on t’other faggot.

You’re welcome to Hell;
I hope friends are well,
At Pareis, Madrid, and at Rome;
And ,now you elope,
I suppose, my dear Pope,
The conclave will hang out the broom.

Then his Holiness cry’d,
All jesting aside,
“Give the Pope and the Devil their dues;”
For, believe me, Old Dad,
I’ll make thy heart glad,
For, by Jove, I do bring thee rare news.

There’s a plot to beguile
An obstinate isle;
Great Britain, that heretic nation,
Who so shyly behav’d,
In the hopes of being sav’d
By the help of a d . . d Reformation.

We’ll never have done,
If we burn one by one,
Tis’ such a d . . d numerous race!
For no sooner one’s dead,
Like the fam’d Hydra’s head,
Than a dozen spring up in his place.

But, believe me, Old Nick,
We’ll play them a trick,
The like was ne’er hatched in France;
For this day before dinner,
As sure’s I’m a sinner,
We’ll burn all the rascals at onece.

When the king with his son
To the parliament’s gone,
To consult about old musty papers,
We’ll give them a greeting,
Shall break up their meeting,
And try who can cut the best capers.

There’s powder enough,
And combustible stuff,
Inf fifty and odd trusty barrels,
Which will blow all together,
The Devil cares whither,
And decide at one blow all our quarrels.

But this was scarce said,
When in popp’d the head
Of an old Jesuitical Wight,
Who cry’d You’re mistaken,
They’ve all saav’d their bacon,
And Jemmy still stinks with the fright.

Then Satan was struck,
And said ’tis bad luck,
But you for your news shall be thanked:
So he call’d to the door
Seven devils or more,
And they toss’d the poor dog in a blanket.

Watts, Isaac, Horae lyricae. Poems, By I. London, 1706

WICKED – Promote Yourself

 baxter106
A wicked gale, 1841,
Took all souls, both old and young.
Among the shipwrecks off the Cape,
No sadder story leaves mouths agape.
Seven ships were swept like splintered trees as
Sailors fought the rising seas.
Fifty-seven lads left that cursed day,
From Truro Harbor through Cape Cod Bay.
With farewells to families and prayers of thanks,
To fish for cod along George’s Banks.
Headed nor ‘east at full sail,
The hopefuls met that dreaded gale.
Soundings dropped as winds blew wild,
And fear spread from man to child.
For closer their vessels approached the shoals,
Which cut their hulls with ripping rolls,
Nature took victims without remorse,
And most were lost who’d set the course.
Legend has it that on autumn nights,
Amidst Truro’s moors, below the heights,
Ghosts of sailors mourn their ghastly plight,
With frightful wails across the night.
So if you dare to brace that wicked wind,
You may hear cries of those doomed kin,
Brothers of the sea who dared to go,
Where others still venture and fight the foe.
Wendy Shreve
(In honor of All Hallows’ Eve and those spirits who are still with us)
NOTE: This poem is based in part on real events off Truro, MA in 1841 (Source: Provincetown Banner, June 28, 2009). The legend is fiction.

The Hag – YOUR FAVOURITE POEM

WWWWWWWWWWWWW

The Hag is astride,
    This night for to ride;
The Devill and shee together:
    Through thick, and through thin,
    Now out, and then in,

 Thorn or a Burr
    She takes for a Spurre:
With a lash of a Bramble she rides now,
    Through Brakes and through Bryars,
    O’re Ditches, and Mires,
She followes the Spirit that guides now.

    No Beast, for his food,
    Dares now range the wood;
But husht in his laire he lies lurking:
    While mischiefs, by these,
    On Land and on Seas,
At noone of Night are working,

    The storme will arise,
    And trouble the skies;
This night, and more for the wonder,
    The ghost from the Tomb
    Affrighted shall come,

A Cal’d out by the clap of the Thunder.Though ne’r so foule be the weather.

    

Robert Herrick (1648)

YOUR FAVOURITE POEM SENT IN BY YOU WHAT’S YOURS

SCARY MARYS HALLOWEEN RECIPES AND THERE’S LOT’S MORE TO COME SO LET’S GET READY FOR THE WITCHING HOUR

SOME MORE OF SCARY MARY’S RECIPES

Baked ginger parkin with rhubarb, vanilla ice cream and hot spiced syrup

Ingredients

For the hot spiced syrup
For the rhubarb
To serve

Preparation method

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 140C/275F/Gas 1.
  2. Grease a 20cm/8in square cake tin with butter.
  3. Sieve the flour, a pinch of salt, the ginger, nutmeg and mixed spice together into a large bowl.
  4. Mix in the oatflakes.
  5. Warm the tins of syrup and treacle in hot water to make it easier to measure them out accurately.
  6. Put the syrup, treacle, butter and soft brown sugar into a small saucepan and melt over a gentle heat, bring up to a simmer but do not boil.
  7. Stir into the flour mixture.
  8. Mix in the beaten egg and milk to create a soft, almost pouring, consistency.
  9. Pour into the buttered tin and bake for 1¼ hours, until firm in the centre.
  10. Remove from the oven and leave in the tin for 5-10 minutes before turning out and cutting into squares.
  11. For the hot spiced syrup, simply whisk all the ingredients together in a small pan and warm, but don’t boil.
  12. Place the rhubarb into a saucepan with a little water and the sugar.
  13. Bring to a simmer and cook until just tender.
  14. To serve, place a spoonful of rhubarb in the centre of the plate, top with a ball of ice cream.
  15. Place a piece of parkin on the side and drizzle over the spiced syrup.

    Nutty toffee apples

    Nutty toffee apples

    Studded with crunchy nuts, these grown-up toffee apples work well for a Halloween or Bonfire Night party recipe.

    Ingredients

    Preparation method

    1. Push the wooden sticks halfway into the apples at the stalk end.
    2. Dissolve the sugar and water in a thick-bottomed pan over a gentle heat.
    3. Add the butter and syrup to the mixture and bring to the boil. Continue to boil, without stirring, until the toffee reaches 140C/275F (use a sugar thermometer to measure this).
    4. Remove the pan from the heat and gently stir in the nuts.
    5. Carefully dip each apple into the toffee, making sure each apple is well coated, and set aside to harden on a baking try lined with non-stick parchment.
    6. Let them cool then eat

     MORE RECIPES TO COME

SCARY MARY SAYS BE SAFE ON BONFIRE NIGHT AND USE THE FIREWORK CODE

 

SCARY MARY SAYS SAFEY FIRST

The Firework Code

Always follow the firework code, stick to these simple rules, and be safe this bonfire night.

• only buy fireworks marked BS 7114

• don’t drink alcohol if you’re setting off fireworks

• store fireworks in a closed box

• follow the instructions on each firework

• light fireworks at arm’s length, using the taper provided

• stand well back

• never go near a firework that has been lit – even if it hasn’t gone off it could still explode

• never put fireworks in your pocket or throw them

• always supervise children around fireworks

• light sparklers one at a time and wear gloves

• never give sparklers to a child under five

• keep pets indoors

• don’t set off noisy fireworks late at night and never after 11.00pm (except on certain occasions)

• take care around open flames such as bonfires and barbecues – all clothes even those labeled ‘low flammability’ can catch fire

The Law

If you misuse them you may be liable for an on the spot fine of £80. If found guilty by the courts you could get a fine of up to £5,000.
It is an offence to:

• buy adult fireworks if you are under 18

• set off fireworks in the street or other public places

• set off fireworks between 11.00 pm and 7.00 am

You can let off fireworks until 12.00 pm on bonfire night and until 1.00 am on Christmas, New Years Eve, Chinese New Year or Diwali.
If you are using fireworks you will need to be aware of your neighbours and make sure that you do not cause a nuisance.

Be safe not sorry

Having fireworks at home can be great fun, as long as they are used safely. Follow our simple steps to make sure your display is safe and fun.

Fireworks are safe if you use them properly. If you’re putting on a home display, you should follow some simple steps to make sure that everyone has a good time without getting hurt.

Keep kids safe

We want children to enjoy fireworks but they need to know that they can be dangerous if they are not used properly. Each year, over half of all firework injuries are suffered by children. The Child Accident Prevention Trust have more guidance on keeping kids safe

Sparkler safely

Did you know that sparklers get five times hotter than cooking oil? Sparklers are not toys and should never be given to a child under five.

Where to buy

Don’t cut corners just to save a few quid. Always buy fireworks from a reputable shop to make sure that they conform to British Standards. This means that they should have BS 7114 written on the box.

Sometimes shops open up for a short time before Bonfire Night but these may not be the best places to buy fireworks from. Staff in these shops might not be very knowledgeable about using fireworks safely and their fireworks might not meet British Standards.

Whatever you do, don’t buy fireworks from anywhere you’re not sure about, such as the back of a van or from a temporary, unlicensed market stall.

What to buy

There are different categories of fireworks. Members of the public can buy and set off most of the fireworks that come under Categories 1 to 3. These are fireworks that include those that you can use indoors, in your garden or at a display. Always read the packet carefully and make sure that the fireworks you buy are suitable for the place where you are going to set them off.

Professional fireworks

Some fireworks can only be bought and used by firework professionals. These include: air bombs; aerial shells, aerial maroons, shells-in-mortar and maroons-in-mortar; all bangers; mini rockets; fireworks with erratic flight; some Category 2 and 3 fireworks which exceed certain size limits; and all Category 4 fireworks.

Setting them off

Only one person should be in charge of fireworks. If that’s you, then make sure you take all the necessary precautions. Read the instructions in daylight and don’t drink any alcohol until they’ve all been discharged. Make your preparations in advance, and in daylight. On the night, you will need…

a torch
a bucket or two of water
eye protection and gloves
a bucket of soft earth to put fireworks in
suitable supports and launchers if you’re setting off catherine wheels or rockets.

Firework displays

If you are organising a firework display for the general public, read our information on how to organise safe and successful firework displays.

Protect your animals

You should take precautions to protect your pets during the times of the year when fireworks are likely to be set off.

COPY AND PASTE AND PRINT OUT

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