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The Bonfire at Night: A poem by Enid Blyto YOUR FAVOURITE POEM – Famous Poet

Bonfire, you’re a merry fellow
With your flames of red and yellow,
And your cheery cracks and pops-
You gobble up the old bean-props,
The pea-sticks, withered plants, and all
The leaves blown down beside the wall.
Your never-ending spires of smoke
(The colour of a pixy’s cloak)
Go mounting to the starry sky,
And when the wind comes bustling by
Oh, what a merry game you play,
And how you pop and roar away!
Your heart is red, your smoke is thick,
On, pile on leaves and branches quick!
Let’s dance around and shout and sing,
Oh, Bonfire, you’re a LOVELY thing!

From the Enid Blyton Poetry book, 1934.

 YOUR FAVOURITE POEM SENT IN BY YOU WHAT’S YOURS

LOOK OUT SCARY MARYS ABOUT WHO DARES TRY MARYS RECIPES ON THIS HALLOWEEN NIGHT?

TRY ONE IF YOU DARE

  • Cinder toffee

This recipe is classed as easy

Prep time:
20 min, plus setting
Cook time:
25 min

My favourite recipe for glossy toffee – perfect for passing around at Halloween and Bonfire Night parties

Ingredients


 Method
1. Line a 15cm square tin with greaseproof or parchment paper.2. Put the syrup, sugar, butter and water into a large heavy-bottomed pan set over a medium heat. Stir until the sugar has dissolved, before turning up the heat and bringing to the boil.3. Cook, without stirring until a teaspoon of the hot toffee mixture becomes a hard ball when dropped into a jug of cold water. If you have a sugar thermometer, it should register 138C. Remove the pan from the heat.4. Add the vinegar and bicarbonate of soda to the pan – take care as the toffee mixture will bubble up and rise in the pan. Pour immediately into the lined tin and leave on one side.5. After about 15- 20 minutes, when the mixture has begun to set, score the toffee in square shapes, using a sharp
Bangers and mash

This recipe is classed as easy

Prep time:
10 min
Cook time:
30 min
Serves:
4

Rich onion gravy transforms this family favourite into a meal fit for a king fro

Ingredients

For the onion gravy

For the mash

  • 1 kg flourypotatoes, King Edwards or Maris Piper are good
  • 100 ml milk
  • 75 g butter
  • 1 grate ofnutmeg
  • salt and freshly groundblack pepper

For the sausages


Method

1. First make the gravy. Heat the olive oil and butter in a saucepan and soften the onions and thyme over a very gentle heat. It’s best to cook them, without colouring, for about 10-15 minutes. Give the onions a good stir now and again.

2. Remove the lid, turn up the heat and continue frying the onions until they turn a deep russet brown. Add the wine and bubble until it has almost evaporated. Pour in the stock and add the bay leaf. Season with salt and freshly ground pepper.

3. Simmer, uncovered for about 15 minutes, until thickened. Leave on one side.

4. Heat the oven to 190C/gas 5. Put the sausages in a small roasting tin, drizzle with olive oil, and cook for about 20 minutes, until golden. Turn once or twice while in the oven.

5. While the sauce and sausages are cooking, start with the mash. Peel, half (or quarter) the potatoes and transfer to a deep saucepan filled with lightly salted water. Boil until the potatoes are tender.

6. Drain in a colander and return to the pan. Shake the potatoes over a very low heat for a few seconds until they have dried out. Crush with a potato masher or you could use a potato ricer.

7. Heat the milk with the butter, nutmeg and seasoning and gradually add most of it into the potatoes, beating well between each addition. An electric whisk is good for this. Check the consistency by adding more hot milk if needed. If you’re planning on keeping the potatoes warm, pour a thin layer of hot milk mixture over the surface and cover with a lid.

8. Warm the sauce and serve with the sausages and mash.

Toffee apples
This recipe is classed as intermediate

Prep time:
20 min
Cook time:
20 min
Serves:
6

Taste nostalgic childhood memories with Roopa Gulati’s traditional toffee-coated apple

Ingredients

For the toffee coating

  • 225 g demerara sugar
  • 110 ml water
  • 0.5 tsp vinegar
  • 2 tbsp golden syrup
  • 25 g butter

For the apples

  • 6 apples
  • 6 wooden skewers, for holding the apples – ice lolly sticks will do

Method

1. Dissolve the sugar in the water over a moderate heat. When it has dissolved, stir in the vinegar, syrup and butter. Bring to a boil and cook without stirring until it reaches hard-crack stage (138C) or hardens into a ball when dropped in a jug of cold water. This should take around 10 minutes boiling time.

2. While the syrup is cooking, pierce each apple with a wooden stick. Once the toffee is ready, dip each apple into the hot toffee, turning it around in the syrup so that each one is fully coated.

3. Leave to harden on a lightly oiled tray before serving. If you’re planning to keep them for a day or two, wrap the apples in cellophan

Scary Mary says don’t forget mum and dad on Bonfire night
 

Hot mulled cider punchIngredients

  • 100 g brown sugar
  • 1 pinches salt
  • 2 litres cider
  • 1 tsp ground allspice
  • 1 tsp  wholecloves
  • 1 pinches nutmeg
  • 2 oranges, peel only, cut into segments
  • 6 cm cinnamon sticks
  • 50  g  blanched flakedalmonds,   lightly toasted

Method

1. Combine the sugar and salt, and add to the cider in a large saucepan.

2. Tie the spices in cheesecloth and add to the cider. Slowly bring to the boil. Cover and simmer for 20 minutes.

3. Remove the spices and add the orange peel, cinnamon stick and toasted almonds before serving in a punch bowls

Chilli con carne

This recipe is classed as easy

Prep time:
20 min
Cook time:
1 hr 30 min
Serves:
6

Ingredients

  • 2 large onions
  • 700 g lean stewing beef, fat removed and cut into 1-2cm cubes
  • 5 clovesgarlic, crushed
  • 800 g canned chopped tomatoes
  • 2 green peppers,  sliced
  • 3   green or redchillies,   chopped, seeds left in if you like your chillies fiery
  • 2 tsp  groundcumin
  • 1 tinned redkidney beans, 400g
  • 1 tsp brown sugar

To serve


Method

Heat the olive oil in a casserole,or saucepan and fry the meat until it changes colour – about 5-7 minutes. Add the onion and garlic and stir for a minute or so before tipping in the tinned tomatoes,chopped chillies, peppers, and a good pinch of salt.

Cover the pan and simmer for about an hour, until the meat is tender and the liquid reduced to a thick sauce. If it gets too dry during cooking, pour in a little more water.

Add the cumin, kidney beans (and a little of the bean liquid,if you like)and the brown sugar. Simmer for a further 10 mins before serving with rice, a spoonful of sour cream, grated cheddar cheese and and coriander leaves as a garnish.  For added spicy kick, serve this dish with hot chilli sauce.

VE Night – Then and Now – by Iris_Bruce

Following are two poems, the first written on 8th May 1945 by me, aged 11:

VE Night

I went to see a bonfire
On V night on a hill
The searchlights all were glowing
And all was bright and still

Then someone raised a mighty shout
‘Throw on some wood’ they said
‘Let’s go and bring the people out
To see the embers red’

‘Let’s let off lots of fireworks
Some yellow, Green and Blue
Some Catherine wheels and rockets
And rain of every hue’

The people sang the people danced
They threw wood on the fire
And many children saw entranced
That scene, their hearts’ desire

For some had never seen before
A fire so big as that
While fireworks and searchlights
They made a union jack

And when at 4 o’clock next morn
The crowd went down the hill
And dawn was breaking far away
That memory lingered still

by Iris Aspland, aged 11

Sixty years later, and now a bit older, written on 8th May 2005:

VE Night

I’m going to see a bonfire
A bonfire on a hill
To celebrate VE night
The memory lingers still

It’s 60 years ago now
And many things have passed
But those celebrations left
Impressions that will last

We’d never seen a firework
Or pretty coloured rain
The only rockets that we knew
Inflicted deadly pain

We’d seen the dockside burning
Incendiaries in the street
But to dance around that bonfire
We thought a wondrous treat

The searchlights that had chased the planes
Made patterns in the sky
The church bells, hooters, sirens
We heard on hilltop high

We sang and danced and laughed and cried
As we went down the hill
And dawn was breaking far away
That memory lingers still

By Iris Bruce (60 years on, and the poetry hasn’t improved!)

SCARY MARY SAYS BE SAFE ON BONFIRE NIGHT AND USE THE FIREWORK CODE

 

SCARY MARY SAYS SAFEY FIRST

The Firework Code

Always follow the firework code, stick to these simple rules, and be safe this bonfire night.

• only buy fireworks marked BS 7114

• don’t drink alcohol if you’re setting off fireworks

• store fireworks in a closed box

• follow the instructions on each firework

• light fireworks at arm’s length, using the taper provided

• stand well back

• never go near a firework that has been lit – even if it hasn’t gone off it could still explode

• never put fireworks in your pocket or throw them

• always supervise children around fireworks

• light sparklers one at a time and wear gloves

• never give sparklers to a child under five

• keep pets indoors

• don’t set off noisy fireworks late at night and never after 11.00pm (except on certain occasions)

• take care around open flames such as bonfires and barbecues – all clothes even those labeled ‘low flammability’ can catch fire

The Law

If you misuse them you may be liable for an on the spot fine of £80. If found guilty by the courts you could get a fine of up to £5,000.
It is an offence to:

• buy adult fireworks if you are under 18

• set off fireworks in the street or other public places

• set off fireworks between 11.00 pm and 7.00 am

You can let off fireworks until 12.00 pm on bonfire night and until 1.00 am on Christmas, New Years Eve, Chinese New Year or Diwali.
If you are using fireworks you will need to be aware of your neighbours and make sure that you do not cause a nuisance.

Be safe not sorry

Having fireworks at home can be great fun, as long as they are used safely. Follow our simple steps to make sure your display is safe and fun.

Fireworks are safe if you use them properly. If you’re putting on a home display, you should follow some simple steps to make sure that everyone has a good time without getting hurt.

Keep kids safe

We want children to enjoy fireworks but they need to know that they can be dangerous if they are not used properly. Each year, over half of all firework injuries are suffered by children. The Child Accident Prevention Trust have more guidance on keeping kids safe

Sparkler safely

Did you know that sparklers get five times hotter than cooking oil? Sparklers are not toys and should never be given to a child under five.

Where to buy

Don’t cut corners just to save a few quid. Always buy fireworks from a reputable shop to make sure that they conform to British Standards. This means that they should have BS 7114 written on the box.

Sometimes shops open up for a short time before Bonfire Night but these may not be the best places to buy fireworks from. Staff in these shops might not be very knowledgeable about using fireworks safely and their fireworks might not meet British Standards.

Whatever you do, don’t buy fireworks from anywhere you’re not sure about, such as the back of a van or from a temporary, unlicensed market stall.

What to buy

There are different categories of fireworks. Members of the public can buy and set off most of the fireworks that come under Categories 1 to 3. These are fireworks that include those that you can use indoors, in your garden or at a display. Always read the packet carefully and make sure that the fireworks you buy are suitable for the place where you are going to set them off.

Professional fireworks

Some fireworks can only be bought and used by firework professionals. These include: air bombs; aerial shells, aerial maroons, shells-in-mortar and maroons-in-mortar; all bangers; mini rockets; fireworks with erratic flight; some Category 2 and 3 fireworks which exceed certain size limits; and all Category 4 fireworks.

Setting them off

Only one person should be in charge of fireworks. If that’s you, then make sure you take all the necessary precautions. Read the instructions in daylight and don’t drink any alcohol until they’ve all been discharged. Make your preparations in advance, and in daylight. On the night, you will need…

a torch
a bucket or two of water
eye protection and gloves
a bucket of soft earth to put fireworks in
suitable supports and launchers if you’re setting off catherine wheels or rockets.

Firework displays

If you are organising a firework display for the general public, read our information on how to organise safe and successful firework displays.

Protect your animals

You should take precautions to protect your pets during the times of the year when fireworks are likely to be set off.

COPY AND PASTE AND PRINT OUT

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