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#Dambusters 70th anniversary of the May 1943 raid – an annotated graphic

GREAT VPOST

Engineering & Technology magazine

The legend of the Dambusters – the 19 Lancaster bombers of the RAF’s 617 Squadron – was enshrined in war-time history 70 years ago, when the planes flew to Germany on the night of 16/17 May to drop their Barnes Wallis-designed bouncing bombs on the Mohne, Eder and Sorpe dams in the industrial heartland of the Ruhr region.

Codenamed Operation Chastise, 56 of the airmen who set out on the mission did not return. Eight bombers were shot down, 53 men were killed and three men were captured. Today’s infographic salutes the incredible bravery of all those who dared to fly that night.

For the full story of the secret mission, check out the dedicated Dambusters website. The Telegraph also has a nice graphic and a timeline detailing the events of that night in May 1943.

Click on the graphic for an expanded view.

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617 Sqd… A lot more than just “Dambusters”…

A Voice In the Crowd

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For those of you who the 617 Sqd name does not ring a bell, 617 was formed at RAF Scampton on 21 March 1943, and was allocated the unit identification code MZ for the period April to September 1939, (even though, the unit didn’t technically exist at the time.) and was the squadron that would go on to bomb the Ruhr valleys dams in Germany, later known as “The Dambusters”.

Handpicked By Wng. Cmdr. Guy Gibson (whom was awarded a Victoria Cross for his part in the raid), it included amongst its ranks contingents of the Royal Canadian Air Force, Royal Australian Air Force and Royal New Zealand Air Force and was formed for the specific task of attacking three major dams in Germany: the Möhne, Eder and Sorpe. The plan was given the codename Operation Chastise and was carried out on 17 May 1943.

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“Caught in a Summer Downpour” – Promote Yourself

Your lovely little post entitled ‘Step Onto Our Stage – Let Your Poem Dance With Others’ was inspiration tonight. Here’s one of mine – just a short one, entitled “Caught in a Summer Downpour”, which makes me smile in remembering the moment it captures:

My books have arrived in Waterstones book shop in Nottingham – Manners Bear And Friends by Gillian Sims

DCIM100MEDIA

Photo by kind permission of Katrina the book buyer in Waterston’s  Nottingham today

 Preparing  to put my  book on sale.

Manners Bear And Friends is a children’s poetry book based on manners. The book is £6.95 plus p&p

ISBN No: 9780956400628

If you would like to order the book you can buy at Waterstone’s Nottingham or online 

Or order direct  from us by email at:  gillianandthomas@yahoo.com

 

For The King And St George

Nice!

crimsonprose

Order of the Garter

St George and Dragon

Honi soit qui mal y pense
Evil to him who thinks evil of it

Edward III established the Order of the Garter on St George’s Day 1349, his aim to bind into a brotherhood a select group of knights, twenty-five in all.

An honourable intent?

The Black Death raged across Europe. The monks in their monasteries, the lords in their manor halls and castles – the king’s own family – the paupers, the hard-working, the idlers, indiscriminate of whom it infected, the plague wiped out between a third and half of all England’s population. Famine and starvation followed. Yet the king ordered a grand tournament – the main event to be a battle to decide which of the countess of Salisbury’s two husbands had the legal right! And for the accompanying festivities the king’s court dressed in their finest. Unsurprising, the monks, clerics and priors objected.

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St George’s Day

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Happy St George’s Day! Nowadays, it’s not St George’s martyrdom that propelled him to popularity, but the tales of his heroism in slaying dragons and rescuing maidens.

Whilst St George never visited the British Isles, during the Middle Ages he became revered by the English and according to legend fought on their side in the Crusades and the Hundred Years’ War.

Several cities, towns and villages around the country are enthusiastically celebrating St George, so we thought we would bring you some nostalgic photos that might help in a small way remind us all of what makes England so great!

Salisbury, High Street 1919

The cathedral city of Salisbury in Wiltshire is one of the few places to celebrate the English National Day of St George on April 23rd and processions, tableaux, and fireworks make it a special day in the manner of the original medieval celebrations of the occasion.

Photo: Salisbury, High Street 1919.

Ipswich, The Ancient House 1921

Ipswich in Suffolk is famous for the Ancient House (or Sparrowe’s House) with its incredible decorative plasterwork known as pargetting. The building was remodelled with its pargetting by Robert Sparrowe around 1670, and an interesting feature of the decoration is St George slaying a dragon (symbolizing evil) whilst wearing a top hat.

Photo: Ipswich, The Ancient House 1921.

Fordington, St George's Church 1898

The earliest known dedication to St George in a church in England is at Fordington in Dorset (now part of Dorchester) that is mentioned in the will of King Alfred the Great.
The St George’s Church at Fordington that we see today was first built in the Middle Ages, and the Perpendicular tower is 15th-century. Parts of it date from around AD1100, constructed in what is known architecturally as the Norman or Romanesque style. The most obvious feature of this period greets the visitor on entering the porch. This is the tympanum, the semicircular stone above the inner door. It has a carving interpreted as St. George coming to the aid of Crusaders at the battle of Antioch during the First Crusade in 1098.

Photo: Fordington, St George’s Church 1898.

Pinner, The Queens Head c.1955

The Queen’s Head is little changed – maybe a horse trough on the pavement but the front of the building is pure English village pub! It was the starting point for many a village pub crawl and some fun times pushing wheelbarrows of tipsy teenage friends on charity fundraising days in the 1960’s. Little did I realise back in 1966 that forty years later I would still be calling at the Queen’s Head but instead of pushing a wheelbarrow I would be playing an accordian for the Whitethorn Morris Dancers! It has been a popular venue for morris dancers and mummers – particularly on St George’s Day.” (A memory shared by John Howard Norfolk.)

Photo: Pinner, The Queens Head c.1955.
Memory: A Traditional English Pub!

Stevenage, St George's Church c.1960

One of the most distinctive buildings of Stevenage in Hertfordshire is the Church of St Andrew and St George near the Town Gardens in St George’s Way, a striking example of modern church design. It was constructed in the 1960s to serve the New Town and was originally consecrated as St George’s, but was re-dedicated to St Andrew and St George in 1984. It is the largest parish church to have been built in England since the Second World War.

Photo: Stevenage, St George’s Church c.1960.

Windsor, The Castle, St George's Chapel 1895

Windsor is dominated by its famous castle, the principal residence of the sovereigns of the United Kingdom and the largest continually inhabited medieval castle in the world. St George’s Chapel is the chapel of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, the world’s oldest order of chivalry; the Order was founded in 1348 by King Edward III who was a great admirer of the warrior saint. The Order originally honoured knightly valour, but today’s Knights of the Garter are chosen from people who have served their country notably or achieved something exceptional. Each knight has a stall in St George’s chapel where their knightly achievements hang (crest, helm, mantling, sword and banner).

Photo: Windsor, The Castle, St George’s Chapel 1895.

Great Yarmouth, St George's Church 1891

Halfway along King Street in Great Yarmouth in Norfolk is St George’s Church, one of the few Classical-style churches in East Anglia. It was built in 1714 by John Price, modelled on a baroque design borrowed from Christopher Wren, and endowed by a special Act of Parliament. This historic church has characteristic 18th-century galleries, pulpit and reredos, and a plaster ceiling above the nave. St George’s Church is now used as an arts centre.

Photo: Great Yarmouth, St George’s Church 1891.

Painted Egg Cartons

NICE

Inspiration Rose

Painted Egg Cartons

Painted Egg Cartons

This is a nice idea to put chocolate eggs in, decorated eggs as show here, or even to add some colour to your fridge instead of boring cardboard.

Painted Egg Cartons

Materials:
Egg Carton
Paint
Paint Brushes
Shredded Paper (optional)

Painted Egg Cartons

Step One: Paint the carton any colour you like. I painted mine turquoise and coral with gold dots for one and gold stripes for the other.

Painted Egg Cartons

Step Two: Place the shredded paper in the carton

Painted Egg Cartons

Done!

Painted Egg Cartons

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HAPPY ST.GEORGE’S DAY FROM POETREECREATIONS

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St George Was A Very Brave Guy

 

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St George was a very brave guy

As he set out to slay the dragon

He set out on his trusty steed

With all his weapons pack on his wagon

 

He hunted high and low to find the dragon

He travelled far and wide

He decided to set up camp and rest

Placed his head in his hands and cried

 

Then in the distance he heard a mighty roar

With fire and smoke he could see

He decided to wait until morning

Snuggled down to sleep under a tree

 

As the sun arose in the morning

He mounted his trusty steed

For he was in a great hurry

As he galloped of at a very fast pace

 

He finally came face to face with the dragon

Who was snorting out fire and smoke?

He looked at St George and sniggered

For the dragon thought it was a big joke

 

A battle ensued between both of them

A furious fight took place

In the end St George was the victor

But the dragon died with a smile on his face

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Malcolm G Bradshaw

Saint Georges day



 

Saint George sat all alone

In a tavern enjoying a flagon

He was pondering deep in thought

On how he was going to slay the dragon

 

He mounted his trusty steed

In his armour with shield and lance

Sped of into the distance thinking

Would he succeed, would he stand a chance?

 

As he approached the clearing

The mighty dragon stood tall

With fire coming from his nostrils

He stood with his back to the wall

 

A mighty battle soon enraged

As George lunged forward with his lance

The dragon fought with courage

But alas the dragon didn’t stand a chance

 

He rid the village of the dragon

So everyone could live in peace

The villages hailed him a hero

For the terror now was to cease

 

George became the patron saint of England

Where it’s celebrated every year

So enjoy all the celebrations you attend

When you see Saint George give him a cheer

  

Malcolm Bradshaw

St George and Smokey Joe

St George he had a dragon

 

He called him Smoky Joe

 

He used to cough and splutter

 

And blows smoke wherever he would go.

 

One day he drank some water

 

And steam came out his ears

 

This made old Smoky wither

 

And brought poor George to tears ,

 

But George still pretended he had slain all the dragon’s

 

But did he slay them all ?

 

They say there are some in England,

 

With lot’s of spiky scales

 

But the myth is that they live somewhere

 

But maybe somewhere in South Wales.

 

By Thomas Sims


The legend of St George’s and the dragon

The Legend of St. George and the Dragon

St GeorgeSt. George travelled for many months by land and sea until he came to Libya. Here he met a poor hermit who told him that everyone in that land was in great distress, for a dragon had long ravaged the country.

‘Every day,’ said the old man, ‘he demands the sacrifice of a beautiful maiden and now all the young girls have been killed. The king’s daughter alone remains, and unless we can find a knight who can slay the dragon she will be sacrificed tomorrow. The king of Egypt will give his daughter in marriage to the champion who overcomes this terrible monster.’

When St. George heard this story, he was determined to try and save the princess, so he rested that night in the hermit’s hut, and at daybreak set out to the valley where the dragon lived. When he drew near he saw a little procession of women, headed by a beautiful girl dressed in pure Arabian silk. The princess Sabra was being led by her attendants to the place of death. The knight spurred his horse and overtook the ladies. He comforted them with brave words and persuaded the princess to return to the palace. Then he entered the valley.

George slaying the dragon

As soon as the dragon saw him it rushed from its cave, roaring with a sound louder than thunder. Its head was immense and its tail fifty feet long. But St. George was not afraid. He struck the monster with his spear, hoping he would wound it.

Fstival of History

The dragon’s scales were so hard that the spear broke into a thousand pieces. and St. George fell from his horse. Fortunately he rolled under an enchanted orange tree against which poison could not prevail, so that the venomous dragon was unable to hurt him. Within a few minutes he had recovered his strength and was able to fight again.

St George fights the dragon with his sword

He smote the beast with his sword, but the dragon poured poison on him and his armour split in two. Once more he refreshed himself from the orange tree and then, with his sword in his hand, he rushed at the dragon and pierced it under the wing where there were no scales, so that it fell dead at his feet.

The dragon is killed

How will you be celebrating St George’s Day?

NATIONAL NO SMOKING DAY

April fools

Mackenzie put a whoopie cushion
on the teacher’s chair.
Makayla told the teacher
that a bug was in her hair.

Alyssa brought an apple
with a purple gummy worm
and gave it to the teacher
just to see if she would squirm.

Elijah left a piece of plastic
dog doo on the floor,
and Vincent put some plastic vomit
in the teacher’s drawer.

Amanda put a goldfish
in the teacher’s drinking glass.
These April Fool’s Day pranks
are ones that you could use in class.

Before you go and try them, though,
there’s something I should mention:
The teacher wasn’t fooling
when she put us in detention.

–Kenn Nesbitt

“April Fools Day”

april

I’ve been known to act like a fool,
not just once but a time or two.
So April Fools Day suits me to a T
It’s a special holiday made just for me!

 Author: Nancy Hughes

April Fool

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It’s that time of the year

When everyone wants to shout

So you have to be on your guard

Don’t let them all catch you out

 

So you be the first one to be aware

Make sure it’s before noon be cool

Catch all your friends on the hop

Playing the game of April fool.

 

Malcolm Bradshaw

DON’T BE FOOLED

Don’t be fooled

On the first day of April

Everyone tries to deceive you all

Some of us are easily taken in

Because we are not always on the ball

 

So, remember as the day approaches

You all will have to stay cool

Because not all of us

Want to become an April fool

 

Malcolm Bradshaw

The Dawn – Promote Yourself

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This saddest chore we will fulfil,
We women weak and weary still
From all these awful days have wrought,
We will embalm him as we ought.

But who will roll the stone away, and what about the guard?
So many things combined to make this day so very hard.
There’s the rich man’s garden, but what happened to the tomb?
My friends nervously approach and peer into the gloom.

An unknown voice calls, “He’s not here!” We scatter, terrified.
A minute later I return and take a look inside.
They’ve taken him! But where and why? What do they hope to gain?
Can’t they just allow us to endure our private pain?

“Please, sir, Mr Gardener, I do not mean to lurk,
Just tell me where you’ve taken Him, I’ll leave you to your work.”
“Mary,” says a voice I know, I look up in surprise,
And wipe the blurring tears from my disbelieving eyes.

It’s Him! He is alive and His body glorified!
“Teacher!” I said, so overjoyed to be there by his side.
“Do not cling to me,” He said, “I must still yet ascend
To my Father up in heaven, I am faithful to the end.”

“Go to all my brothers and tell them this from me:
I’m going to the glory that is mine eternally.”
That dawn began a whole new age, His rule began that day;
We’ll follow our beloved king, the Truth, the Life, the Way!

http://benzwycky.com/2014/04/20/the-dawn/

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